General

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Biloxi

Map: 

Acreage

35,644

Contact

sgranier@wlf.la.gov; 504-284-5264

Parish

St. Bernard

Owner/manager

Owned by Biloxi Marsh Lands Corporation; leased to and managed by LDWF

Description

Biloxi WMA is a low brackish to saline marsh. Major vegetation includes marsh hay cordgrass, black rush, hog cane, smooth cordgrass, saltgrass, glasswort, and three square. There are a few oak trees on old ridges. Widgeon grass is the main submerged aquatic plant.

Due to Biloxi WMA’s tremendous number of bayous, sloughs, and potholes, the area is home to an abundance of fish, shrimp, crabs, waterfowl, and furbearers. There are a few canal spoil banks and ridges scattered throughout the marsh which provide birds and mammals refuge from rising water levels during storms or high tides.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Popular game species on Biloxi WMA include rabbits, rails, gallinules, snipe, ducks (lesser scaup, teal, wigeon, gadwall, shoveler, mottled, pintail, and mallard), and geese (blue and snow). There is an archery only deer season as well. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Common fish species on Biloxi WMA include speckled trout, redfish, black drum, sheepshead, flounder, and croaker. Both recreational and commercial fishermen harvest large amounts of crab and shrimp in this area. See regulations for details.

Other: birding

Directions

Biloxi WMA is located about 40 miles east of New Orleans. The area is accessible only by boat via commercial launches at Hopedale and Shell Beach.

Big Lake

Map: 

Acreage

19,231

Contact

mmcgee@wlf.la.gov; 318-343-4044; 368 CenturyLink Dr, Monroe, LA 71203

Parish

Franklin, Tensas, Madison

Owner/manager

LDWF

Description

The eastern boundary of Big Lake WMA is contiguous with a portion of the western boundary of Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge. Together, these areas form one of the largest remaining tracts of the vast bottomland hardwood forest that historically composed the lower Mississippi River floodplain from lower Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico. LDWF purchased the area through the Rockefeller Fund in three components between 1983 and 1985 (9,833 acres in 1983, 4,888 acres in 1984, and 4,510 acres in 1985).

Big Lake WMA is flat with some ridges and generally poorly drained; terrain varies from 55 to 65 feet above sea level. The area floods seasonally, depending on water levels of the Tensas River, and periodically after heavy rainful. Abandoned and active mineral exploration and production sites, roadways, pipelines, and open water lakes, sloughs, and bayous provide diversity throughout the area’s terrain. There are seven small lakes and six small bayous, making up approximately 200 acres and 25 miles of waterways, respectively.

The forested area of Big Lake WMA consists of relatively closed overstory canopy with a fairly dense understory. Major tree species include nuttall, water, willow, and overcup oak; American and cedar elm; sweetgum; bitter pecan; honey locust; sugarberry; willow; sycamore; persimmon; red maple; box elder; and cypress. The understory includes rattan, Rubus sp., Crataegus sp., swamp dogwood, Vitis sp., deciduous holly, elderberry, Smilax sp., baccharis, switchcane, poison ivy, and many herbaceous species.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: The most popular game species on Big Lake WMA are white-tailed deer, squirrels, rabbits, and turkey. There are youth-only deer and turkey seasons. There are also limited waterfowl and woodcock hunting opportunities. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Boat launches are available on most of the area’s lakes. Recreational fishing for largemouth bass, crappie, sunfish, and catfish, crawfishing, and frogging are popular with area users. See regulations for details.

Camping: There are no public camping areas on Big Lake WMA; however, campsites are available to the public for a fee on adjacent private property.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Recognized by the American Bird Conservancy as an important site, Big Lake WMA is home to large numbers of passerine birds, and many neotropical bird species visit the area every year. Birders regularly observe bald eagles and osprey.

Big Lake WMA and Tensas National Wildlife Refuge are home to a thriving population of Louisiana black bear. Reported sightings are steadily increasing, and black bear research is ongoing in this entire area.

Hiking: The 1-mile Trusler Lake Hiking Trail is located on the interior of Big Lake WMA. Several walking trails follow pipeline rights-of-way.

Other: horseback riding, berry picking

Directions

Big Lake WMA is located 12 miles east of Gilbert. Major access routes include LA Hwy 4 and 610. LDWF maintains a system of all-weather gravel roads and numerous ATV trails that provide access to area users. There are four self-clearing permit stations at major entrances to the area.

Big Colewa Bayou

Acreage

1,798

Contact

mmcgee@wlf.la.gov; 318-343-4044; 368 CenturyLink Dr, Monroe, LA 71203

Parish

West Carroll

Owner/manager

LDWF

Description

Received as a donation through federal bankruptcy proceedings in 1994 and 1998, Big Colewa Bayou WMA consists of six separate units:

  • Bearskin (borders the Boeuf River with about 4,715 feet of frontage)
  • Big Colewa (straddles Big Colewa Bayou)
  • Redwing
  • New Prospect
  • Plum Grove
  • New Hope.

On all units except Bearskin, the terrain is basically flat, varying only 10 feet in elevation—85 to 95 feet above sea level. Most of the Bearskin unit is also flat, but elevation changes abruptly near the banks of the Boeuf River, from 70 to 100 feet above sea level. Roadways, pipelines, sloughs, and bayous provide some diversity throughout the area’s terrain.

Timber species on the various tracts include willow, water, and delta post oak; sweetgum; hackberry; sassafras; cedar and American elm; and pignut hickory. Bald cypress, green ash, bitter pecan, overcup oak, and black willow are found along small stream drainages. Principle understory and mid-story species include palmetto, rattan, greenbrier, trumpet creeper, poison ivy, peppervine, Japanese honeysuckle, hawthorn, deciduous holly, and swamp dogwood. LDWF has planted approximately 400 acres of agricultural land in hardwood trees.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: This area is very popular with deer hunters (archery only). Other game species include rabbit and dove. There are also limited hunting opportunities for waterfowl, woodcock, and squirrel. Big Colewa Bayou WMA has a small game emphasis area. See regulations for details.

Physically challenged wheelchair-confined deer hunting areas are available on Big Colewa Bayou WMA. There is a physically challenged deer season available by reservation only. Click here for a physically challenged hunter permit application and additional information.

Fishing: Freshwater fishing is available along the Boeuf River. See regulations for details.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Dozens of species of neotropical migrants and passerine birds visit Big Colewa Bayou WMA during the northward spring migration. Black bears are sometimes found in the area.

Other: hiking, horseback riding, berry picking

Directions

  • Bearskin: approximately 10 miles west of Pioneer on River Road
  • Big Colewa: south end of Morgan Road, 7 miles southwest of Oak Grove
  • Redwing: east end of Bearfoot Road, 1 mile south of Redwing Community and 6 miles southwest of Oak Grove
  • New Prospect: bordered on the west by LA Hwy 585 and on the east by Bennie Fowler Road, 7 miles west of Darnell
  • Plum Grove and New Hope: 3 miles west of Darnell; no public access roads

The smaller units are walk-in only, but LDWF maintains an ATV/UTV trail that provides access to area users on the Bearskin unit. There is one self-clearing permit station on the Bearskin unit; a self-clearing permit is encouraged but not required.

Bayou Pierre

Acreage

3,753

Contact

jjohnson@wlf.la.gov; 318-371-3050; 9961 Hwy 80, Minden, LA 71055

Parish

Red River, Desoto

Owner/manager

LDWF

Description

Located in the Red River Alluvial Valley, Bayou Pierre WMA has flat terrain with only a 5-foot change in elevation across the entire area. Bayou Pierre bisects the WMA. With poorly draining soil, the area is subject to periodic annual flooding.

During the mid-1900s, farmers cleared the area’s bottomland hardwood forest and drained the area. After several failed farming attempts, the property was deeded to LDWF in 1992.

Bayou Pierre WMA has drainages, wet weather ponds, sloughs, reforested areas, grasslands, and wildlife openings that create habitat favorable for a diverse wildlife community. LDWF has developed four distinct types of wildlife habitat on the WMA:

  • A 160-acre moist soil waterfowl refuge
  • 800 acres in ridge and swale topography/reforested bottomland hardwoods
  • 200-plus acres in reforested hardwood
  • Planted dove fields and open grasslands.

LDWF has partnered with several organizations including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, National Wild Turkey Federation, Quail Unlimited, American Energy Producers, and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service to develop and maintain these habitats.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Available game species include white-tailed deer, rabbit, squirrel, raccoon, snipe, waterfowl, and dove. Deer, squirrel and raccoon hunting are limited due to the young age of the reforested hardwood area. There is a small game emphasis area on Bayou Pierre WMA. Waterfowl hunting is limited to lottery hunts (youth and general) due to the WMA’s small size and LDWF’s efforts to maintain the area as a migration refuge for waterfowl during the winter. High concentrations of snipe use this area during the late winter when local rainfall allows for sheeting of shallow water and saturated soil conditions. Dove hunting opportunities range from good to fair depending on dove migrations and agricultural practices on the surrounding farms. Dove hunters should scout the area during the later portions of dove season when winter cold fronts push additional flights of doves into the area and hunting pressure is generally very light. Trapping is allowed on Bayou Pierre WMA, except in the waterfowl refuge. See regulations for details.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Birding is popular at Bayou Pierre WMA, especially from early fall through winter and during the northward spring migration. Bayou Pierre WMA is an excellent area to see hawks and owls during the winter. A variety of sparrows (white-throated, white-crowned, chipping, field, fox, and song), red-tailed hawks, northern harriers, and American kestrels are also common during the winter. Spring transient warblers include the yellow, Tennessee, black-throated green, and magnolia. Scissor-tailed flycatchers often nest on Bayou Pierre WMA during the summer. Numerous species of reptiles, amphibians, and insects can also be found using the diverse habitat in this area.

Camping: Primitive camping is allowed in designated areas (see map for details).

Directions

Bayou Pierre WMA is located 20 miles south of Shreveport. From LA Hwy 1, take Yearwood Road to Lacoupe Road to access the WMA. LDWF maintains one year-round ATV/UTV trail on the area. Parish-maintained roads also provide access to and through the area.

Bayou Macon

Acreage

6,919

Contact

mmcgee@wlf.la.gov; 318-343-4044; 368 CenturyLink Dr, Monroe, LA 71203

Parish

East Carroll

Owner/manager

LDWF

Description

Bayou Macon WMA forms one of the largest remaining tracts of bottomland hardwood forest which historically composed the lower Mississippi River floodplain from lower Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico. LDWF purchased the majority of the property in 1991; the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development donated an additional 40 acres to LDWF as part of a mitigation project.

Bayou Macon WMA’s terrain is flat with relatively poor drainage; terrain varies from 88 to 94 feet above sea level. Two intermittent streams, Brushy and Buck Bayous, are located on the area.

LDWF has reforested almost 1,150 acres of reclaimed agricultural fields. Overstory timber species include nuttall, overcup, and willow oak; bitter pecan; hackberry; red maple; honey locust; rock elm; sweetgum; and green ash. Common understory vegetation includes deciduous holly, swamp dogwood, trumpet creeper, rattan, Japanese honeysuckle, swamp privet, pawpaw, dewberry, peppervine, hawthorn, greenbrier, and persimmon.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: The most popular game species on Bayou Macon WMA are white-tailed deer, squirrel, rabbit, and waterfowl. There is a youth deer season and a small game emphasis area. There is also a 2-day turkey hunt restricted to participants selected via a lottery. Limited woodcock hunting opportunities are also available. Trapping is permitted for raccoon, opossum, beaver, and other native furbearers. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Recreational fishing, crawfishing, and frogging are popular on Bayou Macon WMA. See regulations for details.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Birding is available year-round on Bayou Macon WMA. During the northward spring migration, dozens of species of neotropical migrants and passerine birds visit this area.

Louisiana black bear frequent this area; sightings have increased in recent years.

Camping: There is one primitive camping area on Bayou Macon WMA.

Other: hiking, horseback riding, berry picking

Directions

Bayou Macon WMA is located 3.5 miles east of Oak Grove and 7.5 miles northwest of Lake Providence. The major access route to this WMA is LA Hwy 2. LDWF maintains numerous ATV/UTV trails on this WMA. There are two self-clearing permit stations located at major entrances to the WMA.

Attakapas Island

Acreage

27,962

Contact

tvidrine@wlf.la.gov; 337-948-0255; 5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, LA 70570

Parish

Iberia, St. Martin, St. Mary

Owner/manager

State of Louisiana, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Description

The state acquired Attakapas Island WMA in 1976. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also owns several tracts of land, including Shatters Bayou, that are managed as part of this WMA.

The WMA’s terrain is characterized by flat swampland subject to periodic flooding and silt from the Atchafalaya River. Areas adjacent to the river and spoil banks from dredging activities provide upland habitat and refuge areas during periods of high water. Many areas within the WMA have silted in; siltation will continue to increase the land-to-water ratio.

The primary overhead vegetation in the swamp is cypress and tupelo with some oak, maple, and hackberry growing in the upland areas. Black willow is prevalent on the newly deposited lands, which are numerous throughout the WMA. Understory vegetation in upland tracts includes blackberry, deciduous holly, elderberry, goldenrod, greenbriar, peppervine, pokeweed, palmetto, and switch cane. Common swamp plants include lizard tail, smartweed, coontail, and pennywort. In 1992, Hurricane Andrew heavily damaged the forest canopy on Attakapas Island WMA. LDWF reforested many of the higher areas along the Atchafalaya River with cypress; ash; elm; water, nuttall, cherrybark, and cow oak; and other upland species.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Available game species include white-tailed deer, rabbit, squirrel, waterfowl, and turkey. There is a youth-only season for deer. Trapping is allowed for furbearing animals. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Attakapas Island WMA is popular for fishing. Crawfish are found throughout the spillway; catfish, mullet, bass, bluegill, gar, bowfin, and freshwater drum are also common. See regulations for details.

Birding: hawks, owls, shorebirds, and neotropical migrants

Camping: There are three primitive camping areas and one camping area with picnic tables and running water located on Martin Ridge Road near Myette Point.

Hiking: LDWF has created and maintains about 30 miles of trails around the reforested plots on the east and west sides of the Atchafalaya River.

Directions

Attakapas Island WMA is located about 20 miles northwest of Morgan City and 10 miles northeast of Franklin. You can only access Attakapas Island WMA by boat. Nearby public launches include:

  • Myette Point boat launch on Martin Ridge Road off Hwy 87
  • Northeast of Charenton off Hwy 326, Charenton Beach Boat Launch
  • Above Morgan City on Hwy 70
  • Off Hwy 75 at Bayou Pigeon landing in Iberville Parish.

Atchafalaya Delta

2018-2023 ADWMA Houseboat Mooring Lease Bid Application Notification

Acreage

137,695

Contact

dleblanc@wlf.la.gov; 337-373-0032

Parish

St. Mary

Owned/managed by

State of Louisiana

Description

Located at the mouths of the Atchafalaya River and the Wax Lake Outlet, Atchafalaya Delta WMA mostly consists of open water in Atchafalaya Bay. Within the bay, two deltas (Main Delta and Wax Lake Delta) have formed from the accretion of sediments from the Atchafalaya River and from dredged material deposited by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Main Delta has about 15,000 acres of marsh and scrubby habitat; Wax Lake Delta has about 12,000 acres of marsh.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Deer hunting is not permitted on Wax Lake Delta; deer hunting on Main Delta is restricted to adult archery hunting and annual youth lottery gun hunts. Harvest per unit effort on deer is extremely high. Waterfowl and rabbit hunting and fur trapping are also permitted. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Atchafalaya Delta WMA is popular for fishing, especially for redfish, catfish, bass, and bluegill. See regulations for details.

Camping: Atchafalaya Delta WMA has two campgrounds with primitive restrooms. There are also a number of pilings available for houseboat mooring. You must have a permit for overnight mooring (16-day or hunting season permit). You may obtain hunting season overnight mooring privileges via a 5-year lease or lottery. Year-round mooring is prohibited.

Other: birding

Directions

You can only access Atchafalaya Delta WMA by boat. It is located about 25 miles south of Morgan City and Calumet.

Alexander State Forest

Acreage

8,158

Contact

adailey@wlf.la.gov; 318-487-5885; 1995 Shreveport Hwy, Pineville, LA 71360

Parish

Rapides

Owner/manager

Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry (LDAF)

Description

Alexander State Forest WMA is managed as a commercial forest with an emphasis on experimental forestry techniques. Much of the timber is managed as pine plantations. The forest overstory is predominantly loblolly pine with scattered stands of longleaf and slash pines. However, creek drainages have been maintained in hardwoods. In addition, red oak, blackgum, sweetgum, hackberry, beech, and water and willow oaks are widely scattered over the forest.

This WMA also includes Indian Creek Lake, a 2,600-acre reservoir, along with a 300-acre recreation and camping area.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Available game species include deer, quail, rabbit, squirrel, waterfowl, and woodcock. White-tailed deer are common on this WMA. Herd density is good; antler quality and body weights are typical of piney woods habitat. Hunter success during the either-sex primitive weapon hunts is generally above average. See regulations for details.

Physically challenged wheelchair-confined hunting areas are available on Alexander State Forest WMA. There is also a physically challenged deer season. Click here for a physically challenged hunter permit application and additional information.

Shooting range: LDWF operates a 100-yard rifle range, 50-yard pistol range, and shotgun range on this WMA. The public may use these ranges during specified times. Click here or call 318-482-2212 for more information on range hours and fees. Click here for the shooting safety zone map.

Fishing and boating: There are four boat launches on Indian Creek Lake, which is available for boating, swimming, and recreational fishing. See regulations for details.

Camping: LDAF operates trailer and tent accommodations with electricity, water, bath houses, and swimming areas. LDAF charges a fee for the use of these facilities. For more information, contact the Indian Creek Recreation Area at 318-487-5058.

Other: Woodworth Outdoor Education Center, Booker Fowler Fish Hatchery

Directions

Alexander State Forest WMA is about 10 miles south of Alexandria, off U.S. Hwy 165 and 1 mile east of Woodworth.

Acadiana Conservation Corridor

Acreage

2,285

Contact

Tony Vidrine 

(337)948-0255

5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, LA 70570

Parish

St. Landry, Evangeline, Avoyelles, Rapides

Owner/manager

LDWF

Description

Spanning about 26 miles, Acadiana Conservation Corridor WMA is a scenic easement located between the I-49 right-of-way west of the Bayou Boeuf-Cocodrie Diversion Canal. There is a small portion of private property within the boundaries of the corridor; the northern boundary of this property starts at the railroad crossing near mile marker 48 on I-49 and the southern boundary is approximately 1.3 miles from the railroad crossing.

This WMA is classified as bottomland hardwood; main overstory species include bitter pecan, overcup oak, sugarberry, swamp maple, water elm, and honey locust. This area has standing water for considerable periods after heavy rainfalls so understory vegetation is typical of poorly drained lands; common species include palmettos, deciduous holly, smilax, poison ivy, blackberry, dewberry, rattan, and peppervine, along with annual grasses and sedges.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting: Limited to deer by archery only. No other hunting or firearms are allowed on this WMA. See regulations for details.

Directions

Acadiana Conservation Corridor WMA can be accessed by boat only; public boat launches are available in Washington on Bayou Courtableau and at Hwy 29 on the west side of I-49. Self-clearing permits are available at these locations.

Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission Calls Special Meeting

Release Date: 08/18/2010

The Wildlife and Fisheries Commission has scheduled a special meeting for 11:00 A.M. on Friday, August 20, 2010, at the Wildlife and Fisheries Building, 2000 Quail Drive, Baton Rouge, LA.

 1. Roll Call

 2. Consideration of Declaration of Emergency and Notice of Intent to Allow Recreational Fishing Including Recreational Charter Boat Guides in all State Waters

 3. Consideration of Request to Appropriate Federal Agencies to Expedite the Opening of Closed Waters to Fishing

 4. Public Comments

 5. Adjourn

2010-245A

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