Wildlife

Pointe-aux-Chenes WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
33,488 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
504-284-5267

Pointe-aux-Chenes Wildlife Management Area is located in Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes, approximately 15 miles southeast of Houma. This area, which is owned by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, includes about 35,000 acres.
Access to the interior is typically limited to boat travel due to the lack of roads. Boat launches into the interior of the area are available on the Island Road and on Highway 665, south of the Headquarters area. The terrain is mostly marsh, varying from intermediate to brackish, interspersed with numerous ponds, bayous, and canals. The only timber stands are located on the Point Farm Unit of the area, or areas adjacent to natural bayous and older oil and gas canals.
Management practices employed to increase productivity of the marshes for furbearers, waterfowl, alligators, and fish are mainly directed towards water control through the use of variable crested weirs and levees.
Game species include waterfowl, deer, rabbit, squirrels, rails, gallinules, and snipe. Furbearing animals present are mink, nutria, muskrat, raccoon, opossum, and otter. The Department holds annual lottery hunts for waterfowl for the physically challenged hunters and for deer for youth hunters.
Inland saltwater fish species, crabs, and shrimp (shrimp may only be caught with cast net) are available to the recreational fisherman. Fishing is excellent due to the proximity to the Timbalier and Terrebonne Bay watersheds. Freshwater fish may be caught in the more northern portions of the area.
Non-consumptive forms of recreation available include boating, nature study, camping (a tent-camp ground is available along Highway 665, north of the Headquarters area), and picnicking. More information can be obtained by calling 985-594-5494.

Pearl River WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
35,032 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(985) 543-4777

Pearl River Wildlife Management Area is located approximately six miles east of Slidell and approximately one mile east of the town of Pearl River. Access is available by vehicle from Old Highway 11 and by boat. Several ramps are located along US Highway 90, concrete ramps have been constructed at Davis and Crawford Landings, and a commercial ramp is located at Old Indian Village. The ramps along US Highway 90 and those at Davis and Crawford Landings have ample parking space.
 
Pearl River totals 35,618 acres and is owned by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. The terrain is flat, drainage is poor, and the area is subject to annual flooding. The forest cover varies from an all age hardwood stand in the northern 45 percent, to cypress tupelo in the next 35 percent, and an intermediate type marsh in the southern 20 percent. The mixed hardwoods are made up of water oak, nuttall oak, cow oak, obtusa oak, overcup oak, live oak, bitter pecan, hickory, beech, magnolia, sweetgum, and elm. The overstory varies from moderately open to closed.

There are numerous streams and bayous on the area which provide fishing, canoeing, boating, crawfishing, and waterfowl hunting opportunities. These are generally accessed from the boat ramps previously mentioned. Several ponds are located on the northern end of the area along I-59.
Game species hunted include white-tailed deer, squirrels, rabbits, waterfowl, snipe, and woodcock. Trapping is allowed for furbearers, including beaver, nutria, mink, muskrat, opossum, raccoon, coyote, and bobcat.  An alligator season is available on a bid or lottery contract basis.

The bald eagle occurs along the streams and lakes in the fall and winter and the golden eagle can be seen occasionally. Swallowtail kites and ospreys are frequently seen.
 
Camping is available only at the Crawford Landing. A rifle range is located on the area and is available for public use at specified times (visit www.honeyisland.org or call 985-643-3938 for additional shooting range information). When the river gauge at Pearl River, LA, reaches 16.5 feet, Old Highway 11 and all hunting, except waterfowl, will be closed.  To monitor water levels, visit the National Weather Service link at http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?wfo=lix&gage=perl1.
 
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 42371 Phyllis Ann Drive, Hammond, LA, 70403, 985-543-4777.

Pomme de Terre WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
6,434 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 948-0255

Pomme de Terre Wildlife Management Area is located off Louisiana Highway 451, six miles east of Moreauville in East Central Avoyelles Parish. Louisiana Highway 451 connects to Louisiana Highway 1 at Moreauville or Hamburg. Vehicular access is by gravel road at the southwest corner. Interior access by water is limited, however approximately 8 miles of ATV trails provides access to the majority of the area.
Pomme de Terre is 6,434 acres in size. The initial tract was purchased by the Department in November 1975. An additional 1372 acres was purchased in 1985, along with other acquisitions, including 180 acres in 1988.
The area is low and flat. Accumulated rainwater is collected in Sutton Lake and released by a water control structure. There are several low ridges running mainly east and west.
The overstory consists mostly of hackberry, locust, elm, ash, maple, and sweetgum; nuttall oaks and overcup oaks are scattered. Willow is dominant in the low lying areas, with cypress occurring toward the ridges. There are some boxelder and sycamore.
The understory consists of haws, deciduous holly, dogwood, elderberry and saplings of the overstory. Some of the other plants are poison ivy, peppervine, greenbrier, and blackberry. Open water and marshy areas, which comprise about 60 percent of the total area, contain water hyacinth, duckweed, lotus, cutgrass, frog?s-bit and buttonbush.
Game species hunted are good populations of deer, wild turkey, squirrels and rabbits, with adequate seasonal populations of waterfowl. Trapping for furbearers is allowed by permit only.
Sport fishing on the area is poor. Commercial fishing is allowed by permit. One improved ramp for boat launching exists.
One primitive camping area is presently available.
Further information can be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, LA 70570. Phone 337-948-0255.

Pass A Loutre WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Contact
Phone: 
504-284-5267

Pass-a-Loutre Wildlife Management Area is located in southern Plaquemines Parish at the mouth of the Mississippi River, approximately 10 miles south of Venice, and is accessible only by boat. The nearest public launches are in Venice. This area is owned by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and encompasses some 115,000 acres.

The area is characterized by river channels with attendant channel banks, natural bayous, and man-made canals which are interspersed with intermediate and fresh marshes. Hurricane damage and subsidence have contributed to a major demise of vegetated marsh areas resulting in formation of large ponds. Habitat development is primarily directed toward diverting sediment-laden waters into open bay systems (i.e., creating delta crevasses), which promotes delta growth.

Waterfowl and other migratory game bird hunting, rabbit hunting, and archery hunting for deer are permitted on Pass-a-Loutre.

A trapping program is conducted annually to control surplus furbearing animals and alligators.

There is excellent fishing in the freshwater areas as well as the more saline waters. Fish species present are typical inland saltwater varieties near the gulf and along river channels. Freshwater species including bass, bream, catfish, crappie, warmouth, drum, and garfish can be caught in the interior marsh ponds. Salt water species include redfish, speckled trout and flounder.

Other forms of recreation available include boating, picnicking, nature study, crabbing, and camping. There are multiple campgrounds on the WMA that are available for tent-camping and one designated area for the mooring of recreational houseboats (see maps for locations).  Prior to mooring, however, houseboats must receive a permit from the Department.  More information can be obtained by calling 337-373-0032.

 

 

Ouachita WMA

Effective March 2015, Ouachita Wildlife Management Area acreage has been consolidated within the new boundaries of Russell Sage Wildlife Management Area and will continue to be managed by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.  To view a site description and map of the combined WMAs acreage, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2777 .

Russell Sage WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
34,845 Acres
Contact
Email: 
lmoak@wlf.la.gov
Phone: 
(318) 343-4044

Russell Sage Wildlife Management Area is located in Morehouse, Ouachita and Richland Parishes, approximately seven miles east of Monroe and ten miles west of Rayville.  Access is provided via U. S. Highway 80, LA Highway 15 and Interstate Highway 20.  The WMA is presently comprised of 34,845 acres following the consolidation of the former Ouachita Wildlife Management Area with Russell Sage WMA in March 2015.  The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries owns 30,651 acres, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers owns 2,954 acres and the Ouachita Parish School Board 1,240 acres.  Russell Sage WMA is distinguished by becoming the very first Department owned wildlife management area in 1960. 

Located within the Bayou LaFourche floodplain, the property is flat and poorly drained.  Elevations range from 55 to 63 feet above mean sea level.  Numerous sloughs and shallow bayous meander throughout and backwater flooding is subject to annual occurrence.  The forest canopy contains a mixture of bottomland hardwoods that are grouped into two major timber types:  oak-elm-ash and overcup oak-bitter pecan (water hickory).  Lesser acreages of cypress-tupelo gum and black willow are present.  Individual species present include Nuttal oak, honey locust, cedar elm, winged elm, sweetgum, sugarberry, willow oak, green ash, red maple, cottonwood, nutmeg hickory, bitternut hickory, and delta post oak.  Common woody understory species include peppervine, deciduous holly, poison ivy, rattan, swamp privet, buttonbush, climbing dogbane, palmetto, greenbriar, dewberry. roughleaf dogwood, trumpet creeper, persimmon, box elder, grape, and hawthorn.

Thirteen waterfowl management units totaling 7,550 acres have been developed.  Included are 500 acres of flooded agricultural fields, 4,500 acres of moist soil management units, and 2,550 acres of greentree impoundments.  Upgrades and renovations to pumping stations were completed in 2015.  These impoundments are heavily utilized by waterfowl as well as shorebirds and wading birds.  An observation tower is present which provides for public viewing of waterfowl and wetland birds.  Russell Sage is also an excellent location for viewing terrestrial birds and raptors.  An occasional black bear is sighted on the property.

Hunting is available for deer, squirrels, waterfowl, mourning doves, rabbits, raccoon and woodcock.  Trapping is permitted for furbearers such as raccoon, beaver, coyote, nutria, mink, bobcat, fox and opossum.  The river otter is present but trapping is not allowed for this species.  A limited lottery hunt is scheduled annually for the alligator.  A small game emphasis area is available which allows for additional opportunity for rabbits and squirrels.

Two camping areas are located on the WMA.  Each site offers primitive camping with the southernmost area having a source of drinking water.

Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Monroe field office, 368 CenturyLink Drive, Monroe, LA 71203, or by calling ph. (318) 343-4044.

 

 

 

Sabine Island WMA

Information
Owned: 
State of Louisiana and Calcasieu Parish Schools
Acreage: 
8,743 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 491-2576

Sabine Island Wildlife Management Area is located in west-central Calcasieu Parish between Vinton and Starks. Access to the area can be attained by taking Louisiana Highway 109 north from Vinton or south from Starks and then taking the Nibblets Bluff Park road west from Louisiana Highway 109. The area is completely surrounded by water and access to the area can only be gained by boat.
Sabine Island is 8,743 acres in size and ownership is divided between the State Land Office and the Calcasieu Parish School Board.
The area varies from low terrain subject to annual flooding for prolonged periods to winding ridges laced throughout the area. Access within is made possible by numerous bayous and sloughs. Sabine River forms the southern and western boundary; Old River and Big Bayou border the east and north.
The forest cover is composed of two major timber types, cypress-tupelo comprising approximately 85 percent with the remainder classed as pine hardwood. In the pine hardwood portions, white oaks, willow oak and sweetgum are found mixed with loblolly pine.
The major understory species found are smilax, rattan, arrowwood, Japanese honeysuckle, blackberries, dewberries and reproduction of the major hardwood species.
Annual prolonged flooding makes it impossible to have food plots. Due to the timber type composition burning can not be employed to help manipulate the habitat for wildlife.
Game species hunted are squirrel, rabbit, deer, woodcock and waterfowl. Trapping for furbearers is allowed. Major furbearing species are raccoon, opossum, mink, bobcat and nutria.
The area offers excellent fishing, both sport and commercial, year-round.
Due to its location and abundant waterways, much recreation is derived from water skiing and boating.
Self-clearing permits are required to access Sabine Island. Additional information and maps may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 1213 North Lakeshore Drive, Lake Charles, Louisiana, 70601. Phone (337) 491-2575.

Sabine WMA

Information
Owned: 
Forest Capital Patners, LLC, etal
Acreage: 
7,554 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050
Map: 

Sabine Wildlife Management Area is located in central Sabine Parish approximately five miles south of Zwolle. Louisiana Highway 6 and U. S. Highway 171 are the major roads providing access to Sabine. This area is approximately 7554 acres and is owned by one major timber company (Forest Capital Partners, LLC).Some smaller tracts are provided by other timber companies and private individuals.
The terrain varies from rolling hills to creek bottoms. The major timber type is loblolly pine plantations. Overstory species include these pines along with red oak, post oak, white oak, hickory and sweetgum. Understory species include yaupon, French mulberry, hawthorn, sassafras, black cherry, wax myrtle, huckleberry and dogwood.
The creek bottoms have an overstory comprised of beech, willow oak, water oak, red maple, black gum, magnolia, southern red oak and sweetgum. Understory species include ironwood, dogwood, wild azalea, deciduous holly and overstory regeneration.
Game species available for hunting are deer, squirrels, rabbits, waterfowl, quail, doves, and woodcock. Turkey hunting is available by lottery only. Trapping is allowed and species available are mink, raccoon, opossum, skunk, fox, beaver and coyote.
There is a primitive camping area located in the northwest portion of the area.
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 1995 Shreveport Highway, Pineville, LA 71360. Phone (318) 487-5885.

Salvador/Timken WMA

Information
Owned: 
LDWF and OCPIA
Acreage: 
34,520 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
504-284-5267

Salvador Wildlife Management Area is located in St. Charles Parish, along the northwestern shore of Lake Salvador about 12 miles southwest of New Orleans. Salvador was acquired by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries in 1968 and includes some 30,000 acres.

Access is limited to boat travel and is primarily via three major routes: Bayou Segnette from Westwego into Lake Cataouatche, then west to area; Sellers Canal to Bayou Verrett into Lake Cataouatche, then west to area; or via Bayou Des Allemands, Accessibility into the interior marshes is excellent via the many canals, bayous, and ditches on the area. .

The area is primarily fresh marsh with many ponds scattered throughout. Common marsh plants are maiden cane, cattail, bull tongue, and numerous aquatic plants. Several large stands of cypress timber are evident in the northern portions. These stands of trees grow on old natural stream levees which were once distributary channels of the Mississippi River.

Game species include waterfowl, deer, rabbits, squirrels, rails, gallinules, and snipe. Furbearing animals present are mink, nutria, muskrat raccoon, opossum, and otter. Salvador supports a large population of alligators as well as providing nesting habitat for the endangered Bald Eagle.

Excellent freshwater fishing is available on Salvador. Bass, bream, crappie, catfish, drum, and garfish are abundant. Commercial fishing is prohibited.

Non-consumptive forms of recreation available are boating, nature study, and picnicking. More information can be obtained by calling 337-373-0032.

Timken Wildlife Management Area

The Timken Wildlife Management Area is a 3,000-acre marsh island that is leased by the Department from the City Park Commission of New Orleans. The area is identified as Couba Island on maps; however, it has been named the ?Timken? WMA after the former landowner who donated it to New Orleans. The area is located immediately east of the Salvador Wildlife Management Area.

Like the Salvador WMA, Timken WMA consists of fresh to intermediate marsh and provides excellent habitat for waterfowl, furbearers, and alligators. More information can be obtained by calling 337-373-0032.

Sandy Hollow WMA

Information
Owned: 
LDWF, Tangipahoa School Board
Acreage: 
4,177 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(985) 543-4777

This area comprised of 3,514 acres owned by the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and 181 acres leased from the Tangipahoa Parish School Board, is located approximately 10 miles northeast of Amite, Louisiana in Tangipahoa Parish.
The area is divided into two separate tracts near Wilmer, LA. The larger tract being north of LA Hwy. 10 and the smaller one south of Hwy. 10. Most of the rolling hill terrain is young longleaf pine with only a small portion of the area composed of mature trees.
The area is primarily managed for upland game birds such as quail and doves. Field trial courses and trails have also been established. Quail, dove, and woodcock hunting is considered good on the area. Deer, turkey, and squirrel hunting is considered fair due to habitat limitations.
A food plot program is conducted in an attempt to increase the wildlife use on the area, as well as hunter success.
Although the WMA is small as compared to other WMAs, it is a valuable research area. Numerous habitat, game, and non-game studies have been and are being conducted on the area.
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Wildlife Division, 42371 Phyllis Ann Rd. Hammond, LA  70403 985-543-4777

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